Guru

(LONDON) por Paula Tooths   The Sanskrit word “guru” means spiritual teacher; however it is also often used to refer to teachers of all kinds—be they teachers of music, ayurvedic medicine, cooking, etc. “Guru” as an adjective means “heavy or weighty” as in “one who is heavy with spiritual knowledge and wisdom.” Additionally, “guru” means servant; “guru” does not mean master. It’s very important to understand that an actual guru never sees himself as the dominator or master of anyone. …

A view of Mandala

(LONDON) por Paula Tooths The term mandala in its traditional Buddhist context is a polyvalent term referring to several distinct yet interrelated concepts. It can refer to one’s microcosmic body, to the macro cosmic universe as a whole, to a two-dimensional bird’s-eyeview blueprint for a three-dimensional multi-storied palace, to one’s mind, or the path to Buddha hood itself. It can be danced,chanted, visualized or painted in colored sand or ink, but all of these mandala media function identically; that is, …

Mandal’ing

(LONDRES) por Paula Tooths The word “mandala” is from the classical Indian language of Sanskrit. Loosely translated to mean “circle,” a mandala is far more than a simple shape. It represents wholeness, and can be seen as a model for the organizational structure of life itself–a cosmic diagram that reminds us of our relation to the infinite, the world that extends both beyond and within our bodies and minds. Describing both material and non-material realities, the mandala appears in all …

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